Archive for the “Coaching” Category



A lot of the questions we receive here at SportsForce Recruiting have to do with athletic scholarships.  As you are probably finding out the hard way, the college recruiting process can be very difficult and confusing. A lot of the confusion comes from athletic scholarships and what is actually available for student-athletes in their perspective sports.

Many families are very stressed over finding athletic scholarships! To help families alleviate the stress, and have a better understanding about athletic scholarships, we have created our Athletic Scholarships Available Guide.

Over the next couple of weeks we are going to take a closer look at specific sports and breakdown what scholarships are actually available and the competition for these scholarships.

We’re going to start off by taking an in-depth look at College Baseball Recruiting.

While there are a decent amount of baseball scholarship opportunities available at the NCAA, NAIA, and NJCAA levels, there is also an abundance of talented high school baseball players competing for all of these different scholarship opportunities.

Below is a chart that shows all of the schools that offer baseball and the baseball scholarships that are available at each level:

Division

Schools Offering Baseball

# of Scholarships per School

Total Scholarships Available

1

298

11.7

3451.5

2

259

9

2331

NAIA

212

12

2544

NJCAA

511

24 *

12264 *

Totals

1280

Varies

20590.5 *

 *Number of scholarships varies

 *** Division 3 schools don’t offer athletic scholarships ***

 

Baseball Participation by the Numbers:

  • 473,500 baseball players at the high school level
  • 10,400 go on to play DI baseball (About 2% of all HS players)
  • 20,200 go on to play DII or DIII baseball (About 4% of all HS players)
  • 6,300 go on to play NAIA baseball (About 1% of all HS players)
  • 15,300 go on to play at Junior College (About 3% of all HS players)

In summary, only about 11% of all high school baseball players actually end up playing some level of college baseball.

So, not only is the recruiting and athletic-scholarship process confusing, but it is also super competitive!  That is why it is very important for you to understand where you stand in the college recruiting process and what schools you should be realistically going after when you are creating your college target list.

A few tips for maximizing your scholarship opportunities:

  • Scholarships aren’t based solely on talent
  • Schools also make their “target list” and look for athletes that will be a good fit
  • Many schools are looking for athletes that have a good academic standing
  • “Full Ride” scholarships are VERY RARE – partial scholarships are more likely
  • There are many more opportunities outside the top Division I schools
  • If you are looking to walk on, there are still scholarship opportunities available
  • BE OPEN to all levels of competition to maximize your opportunities

Remember, even though the recruiting and scholarship process is difficult and confusing, it doesn’t mean you have to go through it alone!  We are here to help provide you with expert guidance and the tips and tools necessary to maximize your opportunities.

 

Over the last five years SportsForce Recruiting has helped over 1,000 student-athletes and families successfully navigate the college recruiting and athletic scholarship process while saving families on average $50,000 in college expenses.

Learn How We Help Families

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One of the keys to NCAA recruiting success is ACADEMICS!

A recruited student-athlete is 3 to 4 times more likely to get accepted to a more prestigious academic university then a non-recruited student or student-athlete.

To ensure you become a recruited student-athlete you have to perform in the classroom Here’s a link to the NCAA core class worksheet.  With this worksheet you can monitor how you are doing in your classes and make sure you are on track with your core classes.

Click BELOW for your Core Class Worksheet:
http://www.sportsforceonline.com/NCAA_Core_Class_Worksheets.pdf

 

Over the last five years SportsForce Recruiting has helped over 1,000 student-athletes and families successfully navigate the college recruiting and athletic scholarship process while saving families on average $50,000 in college expenses.

Learn How We Help Families

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How good a coach is Calipari?

Jeff Morgan: Calipari is kind of like the Phil Jackson of NCAA basketball. He always seems to have all-star filled rosters, and success seems a foregone conclusion. However, people forget his success at UMass was largely with unknown players, and not until he got to Memphis did he start getting some of the top recruits in the country. So, is he the best coach in the NCAA…far from it, but the man does get the maximum effort out of his ridiculously talented players.

Dave Vinluan: With him claiming his first National Championship, Calipari is as good if not better than any elite level NCAA coach right now. His coaching style allows for his players to mesh well together. What’s so good about Calipari is his ability to have his players believing in his team first philosophy, and it doesn’t hurt that he is the master of one and done recruiting.

Kyle Williams: Great coach and an even better recruiter. There is no doubt Coach Cal is one of the great coaches in college basketball. While many focus on his recent success with top recruits at Memphis and Kentucky, this is the same coach who led UMass to 5 straight tournament bids including an Elite 8 and a Final Four trip. Calipari’s free-flowing, high-paced offense allows his athletes to get out and run and has been dominant at UMass (193-71), Memphis (252-69), and on the highest stage with Kentucky (102-14 and a recent championship). Coach Cal has been able to sell his free-flowing style to the elite high school prospects that are looking to play the way they want to play and win while doing so.

Did Calipari need this win to solidify his legacy?

Jeff Morgan: He keeps pushing this question aside like it doesn’t matter, but he absolutely needed to win a title in order to solidify his legacy. Now that he got the monkey off his back however, he’s going to have to win multiple championships to be considered in the same class of some of the best college coaches in the country. While this win was important, he still has a long way to go to become a legend on the hardwood.

Dave Vinluan: Yes. Calipari has reached the Final Four and National Championship previously with stacked line ups and lost both in heartbreaking fashion. Not to mention he has produced first round talent ranging from Derrick Rose to John Wall. This championship solidifies his status as one of the best ever.

Kyle Williams: Absolutely. While Calipari has made numerous deep tournament runs with every program he’s been with, no one can deny the power of championship. Amongst the swirling controversy over the one-and-done rule, along with Calipari’s recent exploitation of that rule, this year’s title possessed significant clout for Calipari. Not only does it add a championship to his resume, but it also silences the critics who said his teams stacked with freshman stars didn’t have the experience to win it all.

Does the 1 and done rule help or hurt high school prospects?

Jeff Morgan: I suppose 1 year of college basketball can help refine a high school player’s game, but I think the impact is minimal. Kids going into the NBA with 1 year of college under their belt are hardly as polished as a 4-year college player. This rule was put in place to make sure that kids weren’t drafted before they were ready to play in the NBA. In that sense, the 1 and done rule hasn’t really done much to change that perception. Hell, even Anthony Davis, the consensus #1 pick in the draft is a project. There are no guarantees he’ll be an all-star player in the NBA.

Dave Vinluan: I think it hurts high school prospects that have no interest in pursuing a college education. Coming out of high school most of these athletes are convinced they want to make Basketball a career. Playing one year in college and having an injury filled year or just not performing well would hinder the chances of them getting to the NBA greatly.

Kyle Williams: The one-and-done rule hasn’t so much impacted high school prospects as it has the college game as a whole. In terms of high school prospects, the rule has generally been helpful in that we no longer see high school players, who have no business being in the league, entering the draft. When looking at college basketball, the negative impact of the one-and-done rule can be seen. College teams are put in a difficult recruiting situation where they have to decide whether or not to focus on top recruits who may spurn the program after just a single year of play. If there is a side that pushes hardest to increase the rule to more than one year, that push should come from the NCAA.

Can other programs compete with the recruiting style of Calipari?

Jeff Morgan: If this 1 and done recruiting strategy continues to breed success and championships, it’s going to be extremely hard for other schools to compete from a pure talent standpoint. The allure of a full college experience is starting to lose ground in favor of a quick 1-year path to the NBA. You watch, if Calipari starts reeling off championships, all the major college basketball programs will adjust their recruiting efforts to entice players to come play for them instead, even if it’s only for a year.

Dave Vinluan: Not now, with the majority of the Kentucky roster expected to enter the NBA draft, that’s an open invitation to become a starter for the Wildcats. It’s hard to compete with his style because of what he has done for his players. Taking them far in the tournament and producing first round talent.

Kyle Williams: Some programs may try, but Calipari is clearly in the best spot to capitalize on one-and-done recruiting. The things he has going for him: coaching at a top program, coaching a system that top players want to play in, and a recent championship to stand for it. While the UCLA’s and Duke’s of the world have similar programs in terms of tradition and success, they both have coaches that bring strict, structured, defensive-minded systems to the table. The program that has the best chance to compete is UNC, with some of college basketball best tradition, Roy Williams’ high-paced style, and Jordan’s legacy hanging over the Dean Dome.

Does Calipari win it all again next year?

Jeff Morgan: Who knows. How can you even speculate on Kentucky’s chances next year when their starting 5 players are going to be completely different? Even if Calipari gets 6 more McDonalds All-American’s to fill out his roster, he still has to basically start from scratch with a whole new group of players. Calipari has had loaded rosters in the past and failed to win it all. If he can’t get his players to work together for a common goal, they could easily have an early exit in next year’s tourney. So for now, I’ll take the field over Kentucky.

Dave Vinluan: As long as he’s got the pulse on the next Anthony Davis, Marquis Teague, and Michael Kidd-Gilchrist, then absolutely yes.

Kyle Williams: That’s tough to say, as there are so many moving parts for Calipari next season that are yet to settle. While it seems to be a lock that Anthony Davis and Michael Kidd-Gilchrist jump to the league, we will have to see if see if Doron Lamb and Marquis Teague decide to follow them or stick around for another year. Calipari already has 5 star recruits Archie Goodwin and Alex Poythress committed as well as 7-foot center Willie Cauley. Undoubtedly the biggest factor will be the decision of unanimous #1 recruit Shabazz Muhammad, who is still deciding between Kentucky, Duke, and UCLA. If Coach Cal lands Muhammad and keeps a player or two from this year’s squad, I like his chances. If not, I see Calipari’s squad as another one of his highly talented young teams that just doesn’t have quite enough to cut down the nets in 2013.

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In an article written by Doug Hix of Youth Fitness Magazine, we come to see that being a successful athlete doesn’t mean making it big time. In all reality being a successful athlete is setting personal goals and pushing yourself to your full ability to reach them. Read on to find out more about this:

1. Set Goals

“Obstacles are those frightful things you see when you take your eyes off your goal.” -Henry Ford

Over the past 12 years, I have trained some of the greatest athletes in the world. Men that have won Super Bowls, gone to the Pro Bowl, starred in Major League Baseball, reached the Olympics, won the Heisman Trophy and so on. Each of these great athletes had one quality in common: they had a vision for the greatness they were working to achieve.

There is scripture that says without vision the people are unrestrained. Setting goals helps establish the vision that one is hoping to attain. During tough times, this vision helps one overcome the obstacles that can potentially derail goals. For example, if one truly wants to become an elite athlete, training is a major component and in order to train the hardest every single day, you must fuel your body properly. Sleep is also a critical aspect to recovery, so don’t let your friends keep you out late at night. Goals will give you the discipline needed to achieve a vision of greatness.

2. Work a System

“First we make our habits, then our habits make us.”
-Charles C. Noble

Too many young athletes place their hopes and futures in the hands of inconsistency. Many have no real game plan on how to reach their full potential. Numerous athletes set goals, yet lack a fundamental plan or system to achieve them. At the youth level, this burden shouldn’t fall on the athlete since they have yet to receive the knowledge.

A system is defined as a comprehensive assemblage of facts, principles and doctrines. The system I have developed over the past 12 years training athletes is built on hard facts and principles that relate directly to athletic success. I am tired of seeing young athletes not fulfill their potential by refusing to apply a system to their athletic development. My professional athletes are successful and achieve stardom because they have a year-round game plan—a system that they follow daily, weekly, monthly and even yearly.

3. Stay Motivated

“People say motivation doesn’t last. Well, neither does bathing – that’s why we recommend it daily.”
-Zig Ziglar

There are over 7 million athletes competing nationwide for 75,000 annual scholarships. That’s a pretty daunting task with plenty of external forces to battle against. It’s important to surround yourself with positive people that believe your goals can be reached.

You may find some motivation from the team of professional athletes we have assembled to answer your questions online. Each has practical experience and has had to overcome some tough odds. Hearing about the obstacles these athletes have overcome will help inspire you to never give up.

Youth Fitness Magazine

Youth Fitness Magazine was created by SKLZ Team Member Doug Hix, with one mission in mind: to educate parents with knowledge and training tools that will help them make the best decisions for their children’s sporting/fitness routine. To get the latest tips in training and nutrition, information on sports injuries and sports specific techniques, sign up at www.youthfitnessmag.com.

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As part of the SportsForce recruiting education, we often mention the difference between being actively recruited and receiving a blanket mailing from a coach or program. Below we have included an email from a coach to a potential college athlete, so you can see a great example of an athlete, in this case women’s soccer player, being actively recruited. We edited the email down a bit, and changed the athlete, coach and college name to protect those still involved in the recruiting process who shared this with us.  Enjoy and feel free to leave any questions in the comment section for us to answer!

I hope this email finds you well. My name is Coach, and I have been the Head Women’s Soccer Coach at State College for the last three and a half years. I saw you play at the Texas Shootout, and you can be a goalkeeper for a lot of teams in this country. Selfishly speaking, I hope potentially for State:-) You are one of the few goalkeepers who plays functional defense, meaning you play high when your team is defending in the middle third. You have great instincts when to come out, you have a quick feet and smooth hands. In short, you would be an impact goalkeeper for us starting your freshman year.

In my first three recruiting classes and for the incoming class this fall, we were able to recruit the first NSCAA High School All-American, the first Regional Team player and numerous players from the Top 20 club programs in the nation, including the # 1 club program at that time.  For this 2011 class we already have three verbal commitments. One player is from the Dallas Texans 93G Red team (she picked us over Penn State), the second player is from the D’Feeters 93 team (we were the only DIII team she looked at) and the third player is from the U17 Bethesda SC Dragons team (again, we were the only DIII team she looked at). All three players come from Top 10 nationally ranked club programs.

Our ultimate goal is to win a National Championship. We are very close to being a Top 20 program in the nation, and we received votes last year already, despite being a very young team. With 7-8 players starting for the last three years who were only freshmen and sophomores and finally a few strong juniors this past fall, we were able to beat and tie nationally ranked programs. This fall our goal is to be a nationally ranked program and to start competing for National Titles (all players this fall will be my recruits). We would love to have you help us with such a quest.

Having listed a few pros (there are many more), I am asking you to consider State as a college choice and to be part of something new and exciting in the quest of winning Conference Championships and even more exciting, a National Championship!

For all the above reasons I would like to start communicating with you about your possible interest in State and our Soccer Program. I would greatly appreciate the opportunity to give you a better picture of State, about the potential of gaining a top education and being part of a successful soccer program.  We are a top ranked school academically in the country, and we are very close to matching that rank with soccer!
Sincerely,

Coach

Head Women’s Soccer Coach

State College

I hope this email finds you well. My name is Coach, and I have been the Head Women’s Soccer Coach at State College for the last three and a half years. I saw you play at the Texas Shootout, and you can be a goalkeeper for a lot of teams in this country. Selfishly speaking, I hope potentially for State:-) You are one of the few goalkeepers who plays functional defense, meaning you play high when your team is defending in the middle third. You have great instincts when to come out, you have a quick feet and smooth hands. In short, you would be an impact goalkeeper for us starting your freshman year.

In my first three recruiting classes and for the incoming class this fall, we were able to recruit the first NSCAA High School All-American, the first Regional Team player and numerous players from the Top 20 club programs in the nation, including the # 1 club program at that time.  For this 2011 class we already have three verbal commitments. One player is from the Dallas Texans 93G Red team (she picked us over Penn State), the second player is from the D’Feeters 93 team (we were the only DIII team she looked at) and the third player is from the U17 Bethesda SC Dragons team (again, we were the only DIII team she looked at). All three players come from Top 10 nationally ranked club programs.

Our ultimate goal is to win a National Championship. We are very close to being a Top 20 program in the nation, and we received votes last year already, despite being a very young team. With 7-8 players starting for the last three years who were only freshmen and sophomores and finally a few strong juniors this past fall, we were able to beat and tie nationally ranked programs. This fall our goal is to be a nationally ranked program and to start competing for National Titles (all players this fall will be my recruits). We would love to have you help us with such a quest.

Having listed a few pros (there are many more), I am asking you to consider State as a college choice and to be part of something new and exciting in the quest of winning Conference Championships and even more exciting, a National Championship!

For all the above reasons I would like to start communicating with you about your possible interest in State and our Soccer Program. I would greatly appreciate the opportunity to give you a better picture of State, about the potential of gaining a top education and being part of a successful soccer program.  We are a top ranked school academically in the country, and we are very close to matching that rank with soccer!

Have a great week and I look forward to hearing back from you.


Sincerely,

Coach

Head Women’s Soccer Coach

State College

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Whether you perform in a team sport or an individual sport like track, swimming, or golf, it is important that you be a team player. A team player is defined as a person who can function effectively as part of a group of individuals, sharing information and striving towards a common goal. These qualities are not only shown in your athletic field, but reflected in your day-to-day functions. They play an essential role within your friends, family, jobs, academics, and athletics. Being a team player will help you improve your game, increase positive attitudes with those around you and within yourself, and create great opportunities.

Communicate Effectively

Listen to and understand what others have to say. If you have a problem, speak up in a respectable manner. Talk to your teammates to figure out a solution together.

Support Each Other

The support from just one person can make all the difference. Help each other out. Offering compliments and advice will only bring your team closer together. Cheer for your teammates and they will do the same for you.

Be Responsible

If you are expected to do something or be somewhere on time, then do it right. Gain the trust of your teammates. They should be able to rely on you and you should be able to rely on them.

Dedicate Yourself

Show that you are committed to your team, even if that means sacrificing your free time. Let them know that you will try, try, and try again until you reach your goals. Contribute what you can and prove that you are willing to share the workload.

It doesn’t matter if you are the best or worst player on your team; every athlete must work together in order to reach the team’s full potential. Following these four simple steps will bring out the best in you and your teammates. Being a team player will make you a better athlete and a better person, and  it shows great character and qualities that college coaches are looking for.

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Coach Kentera and XX1090 Sports Radio hosted SportsForce CEO Andrew Beinbrink recently to discuss the changing time line of college recruiting, the importance of video in the recruiting process and how SportsForce is working hard to help high school student athletes in every way possible. Check out the interview below. Coach Kentera highlights high school sports every week for XX1090 and is himself very familiar with college recruiting as he’s been a mentor to hundreds of student athletes guiding their careers in many ways including placing over 100 students at the college level and having 37 players drafted or sign professional baseball contracts. Check out the full interview below.

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Each year the first week of February and the National Signing Day for college football becomes the pinnacle of years of hard work for many of the most prestigious football programs in the country. This year the world of college football has been shaken up by notable coaching changes and even health issues and the lure of the NFL. At SportsForce we are heavily involved in the recruiting goals of numerous top student-athletes. Because of this unique relationship we build with student-athletes and families are able to learn firsthand of many of the recruiting decisions and thoughts that families have when deciding what college is the right fit for them.

The USC Trojans (9-4) were recently voted the college football program of the decade and captured two national titles under Pete Carroll’s reign. With the departure of Carroll to the Seattle Seahawks, the University of Southern California should be prepared to lose some of their top- ranked or at least potential recruits. Recalling Lane Kiffin back to USC leaves much to be desired and could prove to be disastrous. His one-year stop at Tennessee (7-6) was quite disappointing, especially if you consider the reputable and expensive coaching staff. Following the uncertainty at the coaching position both Dillon Baxter and Kyle Prater were second guessing their decisions to play for USC, but Lane Kiffin deserves credit for persuading them to stay. Lache Seastrunk, a once potential high-profile recruit for the Trojans cancelled his visit altogether and for the moment looks as if he is headed to another PAC-10 powerhouse in Oregon.

Florida (13-1) faced a similar scenario as Head Coach Urban Meyer announced his resignation due to health reasons in late December, but a day later decided to take an indefinite leave of absence instead. The expected return of Meyer must have been a key factor for Ronald Powell, the top ranked recruit in the 2010 class, when he picked Florida over USC. It is believed that Sharif Floyd, another highly sought after recruit may have discussed college choices with Powell and chosen Florida so the two can play alongside each other. The pairing should provide the Gators with an extremely solid defensive line for the next couple of years.

Not only will these coaching changes play a role in determining the outcome of the recruiting class, but it also may be a factor in whether college players chose to stay for another year or enter the draft. When Notre Dame let Charlie Weis go, it probably made it easier on Jimmy Clausen and Golden Tate to leave as underclassman. As signing day quickly approaches keep a close eye on how these coaching changes and uncertainties are affecting player decisions and team dynamics.

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I am an executive recruiter by day and High School Varsity Head Coach by afternoon.  I rub elbows with top level executives nationwide in the retail world.  I coach and speak to executives about their professional experience and how to effectively communicate their skill sets and successes in order to make them the best candidate for the job they are interviewing for.  I have coached hundreds of professionals, critiquing their resumes, improving their interview style, preparing them with potential questions and rehearsing answers.  I am a master interview preparer but when it came to preparing myself to interview for a Girls Varsity Lacrosse Head Coach role – I was terrified.  Scared stiff, actually.

I counseled with my boss, college teammates, fellow High School Varsity Coaches and college coach friends and acquaintances regarding strategy and preparation.  I took all of their advice and combined it with my own knowledge of executive recruiting to answer all of my questions.  The result: I got the job.

Q: How does one prepare for a Head Coach interview?

Prepare a coaching book, ideally a 3 ring binder including:

-Detailed practice plans with objectives and coaching notes, draw out your drills.

-Drawn out offensive and defensive strategies

-Offensive plays drawn out

-Goals and game plan for the season including: County / State Championship, highest GPA, implement a study hall for student athletes, create a relationship with teachers to ensure grade accountability, community service project to promote teamwork off the field.

-Letters of Recommendation

-Professional resume including ALL coaching experience

Talk to your friends who are coaches and players, pick their brains, talk to parents of student athletes you have coached – ask them what concerns they have for you coaching, they will have some and stress that you want to hear them to overcome them.  Create a coaching philosophy and write it down.

Q: What is the Athletic Director looking for?

An accountable, responsible, assertive individual, who is confident, articulate, strategic, plays by the rules and values sportsmanship.  Always speak and think in the best interest of the school.  Read the school’s mission statement and be sure your coaching philosophy is in alignment with that.  The AD wants strong student-athletes and he wants a coach who will be there long-term, not one season.

Q: Who will I be going up against?

You may be going up against another Varsity Head Coach, the JV Coach, the Assistant Varsity Head Coach or a parent.  Whichever the case, do your homework on the other candidates and cater your strengths to eclipse their weaknesses.  Think strategically and be careful to NOT mention their names.  Any advertisement is good advertisement; do not waste your precious time in front of the panel by addressing your competition.  Take the high road and focus on yourself.

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