Posts Tagged “high school athletes”



Podcast

We’re here again with The Realities of College Recruiting Podcast Episode 2. This week’s episode is titled, “Times have changed.”

Our 2nd episode features Ryan Thompson (former college baseball player and MLB Scout) and Andrew Beinbrink (Former All-American & MLB Player) discussing just how much the recruiting process has changed in the last 10 years.

What’s the best route to take when considering college?
What are the best strategies to undertake?
Am I doing enough to get noticed by college coaches?

 

This podcast episode will also cover:
– Finding your own path to college
– Prioritizing which methods are the best to gain more exposure
– The amount of competition in today’s recruiting process
– Understanding where you fit on a college coaches recruiting board

Don’t want to miss an episode?

Sunbscribe on iTunes

About the Realities of College Recruiting Podcast:
The Realities of College Recruiting podcast, brought to you by SportsForce, will tackle some of the toughest college recruiting questions. Our college recruiting experts will share their personal expertise and key insights that will help you maximize your college recruiting efforts. This is a weekly podcast that is hosted by former MLB scout for the Cleveland Indians, 2x coach of the year (Junior College) and current recruiting advisor for SportsForce, Ryan Thompson The Realities of College Recruiting podcast will bring you interviews with some of the top college coaches from around the country in order to help make your college goals a reality! Raise your game with SportsForce!

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Podcast

We’ve launched a brand new podcast to help parents and student-athletes understand the challenges, strategies, and tactics required in order to navigate the recruiting process with confidence.

Introducing The Realties of College Recruiting Podcast. Each week we will tackle some of the most important questions about the college recruiting process. Hosted by former collegiate athletes, The Realities of College Recruiting Podcast will give you expert advice and insights into the world of college recruiting.

In our first episode, Ryan Thompson (former college baseball player and MLB Scout) discusses when the best time to get started in the recruiting process is…

How early is too early?
When do colleges begin the recruiting process?
How do you get noticed in the first place?

Find out all of the answers to these questions and much more in this week’s episode!

This podcast episode will also cover:
– How athletic and academic ability factor into the recruiting process
– The differences between NCAA division levels
– Finding the best college fit for you
– Getting an unbiased evaluation is key

Don’t want to miss an episode?

Sunbscribe on iTunes

About the Realities of College Recruiting Podcast:
The Realities of College Recruiting podcast, brought to you by SportsForce, will tackle some of the toughest college recruiting questions. Our college recruiting experts will share their personal expertise and key insights that will help you maximize your college recruiting efforts. This is a weekly podcast that is hosted by former MLB scout for the Cleveland Indians, 2x coach of the year (Junior College) and current recruiting advisor for SportsForce, Ryan Thompson The Realities of College Recruiting podcast will bring you interviews with some of the top college coaches from around the country in order to help make your college goals a reality! Raise your game with SportsForce!

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Lacrosse college coaches

…and just what are you showing to college coaches?

Now that many of the club teams and tournaments are winding down until October, it’s important to capitalize on your summer experience. While many parents elect to purchase professional videos from the various events, the quality of the video is only one component of what makes an effective and attention-grabbing highlight reel.

In this installment of our College Game Plan Education series, we’ll provide some basic tips for creating and editing your game film to make the best impression on potential college lacrosse recruiters.

What you want to show
The goal with any highlight reel is to give college coaches an idea of how you can play the game and the special talents you believe set you apart. Whether it’s 1-on-1 defense, shooting, open-field speed, or FOGO skills, you want the reel to have a definite theme. Don’t get us wrong, you absolutely need to show more than one skill set, but you want your highlights to be a representation of your strongest attributes, allowing coaches to evaluate how you play and where you might fit in their program.

What you don’t want to show
Lacrosse is a flow sport, meaning that the action never really stops. Unlike football or baseball, where a “play” has a beginning and an end, lacrosse can thrust a player from offense to a loose ball to defense in a very short time. This makes editing clips very important. Factors like the quality of your competition, your demonstrated lacrosse IQ, and how you interact with your team may not jump out to a young player, but college coaches can take a lot from the fringes of your video. Typical examples of no-nos would be dodging through several defenders to score a goal despite open teammates, taunting the opposition, performing a solo celebration that is only about you, or passing up a good shot to go for a BTB or other “fancy” shot. If you drop the ball three times on your way to the goal or miss a pass before picking it up to score, the clip should only include the ground ball and the shot. And just as an FYI, coaches usually aren’t terribly impressed that you are good enough to try an advanced move in a game…if it didn’t work, don’t include it.

Sequencing your clips
The first 45 seconds of your video will likely dictate whether a coach watches the whole thing, so don’t bury your best clips or try to crescendo at the end. After you show your personal information, take the three most impressive examples of how you play and lead with them.

After these initial clips, start to mix in the other aspects of your game to show you have more than one dimension. Continue to pepper in the clips that support your general video theme, whether you’re presenting yourself as a scorer, feeder, ground ball specialist, or defender. Again, the best of these clips should be toward the front as well. For the remainder of the 3-4 minute highlight reel, simply mix in the various clips you have, but with the understanding that sometimes less is more, so don’t add extra clips to get to a certain video length if they don’t truly show your skill level or what you can do.

Guidelines for your highlight reel:

  1. Start with your name, class, school name, and club team (include GPA if 3.5+)
  2. The first few clips are your best…the “wow” clips that grab attention
  3. Scour your clips and edit to ensure you’re not showing anything undesirable
  4. Don’t exceed 3-4 minutes of clips
  5. Include your contact info and your coaches’ contact info

Most college coaches will request a video before they take the time to talk to you, so it’s very important to make sure you’re truly aware of what you’re presenting. Ask your coach to look at it and provide feedback before sending it out to college programs, make any suggested edits, and good luck!!

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The following is a Guest Post by former NFL Cornerback, Charles Dimry of Velocity Sports Performance Carlsbad

Less than 5% of high school athletes will ever play in college and those that want to must have a three part plan:  They must be eligible; they must be visible; and they must be able.  Effort in the classroom will make you eligible.  Working with SportsForce will make you visible.  To make sure you’re able to play at the next level, you must be willing to do extra training.  Trainers appear to be everywhere.  The key is identifying which trainers and facilities can provide the injury prevention and improvement that high school athletes need.  Here are a few tips that will help you make an educated decision when choosing a trainer or facility:

  • What is the background of the trainer? If you are going to trust and pay a coach, you have the right to ask about their qualifications.  Look for facilities with degreed and certified speed and strength coaches.  A personal trainer specializes in improving appearance.  A speed and strength coach specializes in improving performance.  These are very different things.
  • Where does the training protocol come from? Be wary of companies or individuals who do not have a consistent methodology or training protocol.  Just like an academic tutor, an athletic training program should follow a proven curriculum.
  • Is technique priority number one? – Don’t worry about how much weight your athlete is lifting, worry about the technique they use.  Good coaches always have athlete safety on their mind and an exercise done improperly is not worth the time spent doing it.   Athletes should be supervised and corrected.
  • Do they have a system for measuring results? Each company or trainer should have an objective way to show you gains made during their training program.  Athletes use this data to gauge their own improvement and performance coaches use this data to measure the efficacy of their training curriculum.
  • Can they provide you with testimonials? High school athletes need to improve performance, not appearance.  Can the trainer point to experience doing what YOU need?  College coaches want quick, powerful athletes.  Make sure your trainer knows how to combine strength increases with speed increases.

Remember, the goal for high school athletes is to improve performance, not appearance.  A health club trainer who primarily works with adults is not the most qualified person to train athletes.  More than anything else, athletes need to be quick and powerful.  Make sure you chose a trainer and facility that have a history of doing just that.

For a list of SportsForce’s Training Partners, including Velocity Sports, CLICK HERE

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