Posts Tagged “College Coaches”



We would like to congratulate Aryan Chordia on his commitment to Carnegie Mellon University! Here is Aryan’s recruiting story and interview after his commitment. Good luck as a Tartan!

aryan chordia
1.  Share your recruiting story and status

 The process for us was quite confusing at first as coming from Dubai we were quite unaware of how the process of college golf and college recruitment worked. However, through our initial discussions with Dave on Skype a lot of these doubts were cleared and it was great that we could fly over to the states for the summer to play, meet personally with Dave to further strategize my recruitment process and experience college recruitment first hand.

2. What school are you going to, and why did you choose them?

Carnegie Mellon – Firstly, as they are a top ten Engineering school and academics was my primary focus. Second as they have a great golf team and I connected very well with the coach.

3. How did SportsForce help in the process?

I was personally introduced to several college coaches which was otherwise impossible so it was only thanks to SportsForce that I got noticed. They expertly guided me through the process and how to interact with the coaches.

4. What advice would you give to other players and parents with the recruiting process (ex. start early, get a highlight video)?

Start early and stay relaxed!

5. How excited are you on your future in college?

 Can’t wait to begin my college career and compete both in the classroom and on the golf course.

6. Would you recommend SportsForce to any other student-athletes? Why?

Definitely would recommend – SportsForce has extremely professional services and structured plans as well as being excellent at developing strong personal relationships with families and college coaches.

 

Over the last five years SportsForce has helped over 1,000 student-athletes and families successfully navigate the college recruiting and athletic scholarship process while saving families on average $50,000 in college expenses.

Comments No Comments »


Lacrosse

So you’ve developed your recruiting game plan, effectively marketed yourself to your target schools, and you’re starting to see some responses and interest from college coaching staffs.  When you get past the initial emails expressing their mutual interest, the next stage is to get on the phone together.  So what are you supposed to say?

In this edition of our college lacrosse education series, we’ll cover some of the things you need to keep in mind when you reach the stage of speaking on the phone or in person with a coach who is actively recruiting you.  Like many things in life, relationships are the key to a successful recruitment, and often a phone call is an early step in fostering those relationships with college programs.

Breathe

Yes, there is a physical component to this.  We’ve all felt anxiety in new situations…it’s a natural and normal reaction.  Just like performing on the lacrosse field, you’ll do better when you can calm your nerves to simply perform.  One of the main ways you can control this (on the field and off) is through your breathing.  Before the call, do some controlled deep breathing exercises and review the information you’ve gathered on the school, lacrosse program, and coach to whom you are scheduled to speak.  If you get hung up during the call and find yourself sucking air, try to take deep breaths with your mouth away from the phone while the coach is speaking.

Be honest/ this is about YOU

Of course you don’t want to lie to a coach on the phone or in person, but what we’re talking about here is providing a coach with YOUR goals and dreams.  We’ve all memorized the “right answers” to questions about our game- “it’s about the team”, “I’ll play anywhere you need me”, “I just want to be a good teammate”, but that doesn’t tell a recruiter what you think YOU can bring to their program.  If you want to compete for a starting spot as a freshman, say that.  If you’re willing to play defensive midfield for a year or two to get the chance to compete for an offensive spot, say that, but it needs to be about what YOU want and what YOU are willing to do to make that happen.  You have to realize that your coach and your program aren’t in charge of your progression, so it’s up to YOU to get better and compete for playing time.  At the college level, your desire and dedication to reaching your own goals serve as an important indicator to a coach of how well you will play for them and their program, increasing your ability to secure a roster spot or scholarship offer.

Avoid negative statements

There is a difference between saying you prefer a larger university and saying you don’t like small schools.  There’s a difference between saying that you’re interested in higher-level academics than something disparaging, even about another school.  As a high school student-athlete, it’s likely that you have an idea of what you want, but you really don’t know what will work best for you and your family.  The risk you run by going negative is in offending a recruiter.  These coaches are proud and dedicated to their schools and programs, so the wrong critical or negative comment can change the complexion of the conversation and end their recruitment of you.  Enter each interaction with an open mind, ready to listen to what the coach is trying to tell you about the opportunity they’re offering.

Ask questions

One of the best ways to let a coach know that you’re seriously interested is through thoughtful questions.  You want to ask things that can’t be found through a quick google search.  Information like majors offered, class sizes, and campus location can all be found quickly and easily.  If you want to maximize your time with the coach, you want to ask questions you can’t find online:

  1. What would my typical day look like in the fall? In the spring?
  2. What type of player do you recruit? How many are you recruiting in my class?
  3. Where do you see me fitting in your program? What can I work on to fit better in your program?
  4. Does the lacrosse team live together? Is there a Greek system or a “Lacrosse Fraternity”?
  5. Is there a prevalent major among the guys on the team?

These are just a few examples, but you want to ensure that you convey to the coach that you have thought about his program and you are interested in learning more from him.  That kind of preparation encourages the coaches to engage with you and lets them know they’re not wasting their time with a prospect that is only lukewarm on their school.

Don’t commit to anything you’re not sure of

College coaches are salesmen.  They have to be salesmen to attract the best recruits and build their programs.  Because they are juggling 75 recruits to commit 15 of them, they sometimes get aggressive in asking for your thoughts on commitment to their school.  Don’t let a coach paint you into a corner or solicit an answer you’re not prepared to give.  A simple “I would need to discuss that with my family before I give you an answer” will usually suffice.  The same applies for pressure to visit the campus – “Thanks coach, and I’ll sit down with my parents to see if that weekend can work for us as well”.  The main thing you want to avoid is agreeing to something only to go back on it later, which can create issues in your relationship with that coach.

Phone Call Tips

While we often talk about this college selection process as one of the most important decisions you’ll make in your life, we also must recognize that a coach’s choices affect their families and livelihoods as well, so they take this process very seriously.  They want to get to know the real you so they can evaluate your fit in their program, both on the field and off.  Your ability to communicate effectively and show genuine interest in their school and lacrosse program can greatly impact the opportunities you get throughout the recruiting process.  You certainly don’t have to be polished and have all the answers, but effectively communicating through some nerves shows coaches your maturity and begins to give him an idea of who you are, both as a student-athlete and a young man.

Comments No Comments »


Recruiting Events

As we have mentioned many times, tournaments, showcases, or camps  can serve as a great way for you to significantly increase your recruiting exposure. They can also serve as a great way to increase your contact with the college coaches on your target list and to maximize your college recruiting and scholarship opportunities.  You need to make sure you are taking advantage of these opportunities!

Have you connected with college coaches both before and after your events?

Many of these events are set up to include many top colleges coaches from across the country. You should choose your events by figuring out where your target schools are attending and where you can play against the best competition and maximize your exposure.  Sometimes this means regional team events, prospect days, or individual showcases.

Reaching Out Before an Event

The first thing you need to do is reach out to all of the coaches from the colleges on your target list that will be attending your upcoming events. You will want to introduce yourself, let them know your interest in their program, and how and where they can see you at the upcoming event. (See a full example below)

Here is what you want to make sure you include in your email to coaches:

– Full Name                           – School                                                               – Club Team Name

– Position(s)                          – Grad Year                                                         – Jersey #

– GPA                                     – Club/ High School Coach Contact Info

– Tournament Schedule (Fields, Times, etc.)

 

Example Email to Coaches before a Recruiting Event:

Email Recruiting Events

Following Up After an Event

Many of these events are designed to give coaches a great chance to see a good number of potential recruits playing against top competition. Do you feel that you have had a good amount of coaches at your games? Did you contact your target schools ahead of your events and did their coaches come out to watch you play?

If yes, the most important thing to do now is to follow up with them and thank them for taking the time to come out and watch you play. The biggest challenge in the recruiting process is establishing a solid relationship with your target schools’ coaches.

With the remaining events this year, it is important that you stay relevant in these coaches’ eyes.  Establishing and maintaining these relationships with meaningful dialogue will be the most crucial component in getting an offer from your target schools.  So while you don’t want to overwhelm them with contact, get your highlight video made, provide a personal update, and follow up with the coaches you’ve met to make sure that you stay on their radar.

Comments No Comments »


Podcast

We’re here again with The Realities of College Recruiting Podcast Episode 6. This week’s episode is titled, “Don’t play for college coaches.

Our 6th episode once again features Ryan Thompson (former college baseball player and MLB Scout) and Andrew Beinbrink (Former All-American & MLB Player) discussing what happens if you try to play for the college coach who is scouting you and who you really should be playing for.

What are college coaches looking for?
For which reasons should you be playing the game?
How can you perform well while being under pressure?

Find out all of the answers to these questions in this week’s episode!

This podcast episode will also cover:
– How to keep the passion for your sport alive
– The importance of competition
– Find your own best approach to the sport you play

Don’t want to miss an episode?

Sunbscribe on iTunes

About the Realities of College Recruiting Podcast:
The Realities of College Recruiting podcast, brought to you by SportsForce, will tackle some of the toughest college recruiting questions. Our college recruiting experts will share their personal expertise and key insights that will help you maximize your college recruiting efforts. This is a weekly podcast that is hosted by former MLB scout for the Cleveland Indians, 2x coach of the year (Junior College) and current recruiting advisor for SportsForce, Ryan Thompson The Realities of College Recruiting podcast will bring you interviews with some of the top college coaches from around the country in order to help make your college goals a reality! Raise your game with SportsForce!

Comments No Comments »


Lacrosse scholarship
As I watch the MLL and high-level college lacrosse on TV these days, it occurs to me that every player I’m watching, to the last man, has put in the time, effort, and focus required to be truly good at the highest level of the game.  Many young players I talk to believe that mastery of their chosen sport is predestined, or that some kids just get lucky in the genetic lottery…but I know better.

Raw talent and athleticism can dominate a 7/8th-grade lacrosse game, and we’ve all seen that in action.  When you get to higher levels, however, the players that are putting in the work to improve their game quickly catch and surpass these “naturally good” players who don’t put as much work in to get better.  Players who are building their strength and endurance in the offseason, who never let their stick go untouched in any given week, who show up to practice to train hard, and who take care of their health and nutrition habitually eventually rise to the top.

Hard work beats talent when talent doesn’t work hard

We’ve all heard the stories about Michael Jordan being cut from his high school basketball program as a freshman, Steph Curry getting very little interest from college coaches, and Tom Brady being drafted in the NFL’s sixth round, 199th overall.  If they simply accepted these circumstances and believed they just “didn’t have it”, where might they be today?  Certainly not among the greatest performers their sports have ever seen.

So here are some things that highly successful athletes do to stay ahead:

1. While the world sleeps, they work

How many times do you catch yourself saying “I just ran out of time today,” making an excuse for why you didn’t go to the gym, or go for a run, or hit the wall for some stick work? I know I have. Well here is your solution… get up early, perhaps 5:00/6:00 am, and get it done first. I promise you all Fortune 500 CEO’s and Olympic athletes don’t sleep in or watch 4+ hours of TV a day, or waste hours on social media.

Think about it, do you want to be someone who reads about other people’s greatness or do you want to be someone that others read about your greatness?  You decide. I think you will find that the morning calm before the world wakes up is a magical and spiritual time, and there is no greater feeling in the world than heading off to school, or your work day, knowing that you have already achieved something great… a long run, gym, or yoga class.

2. Their work creates confidence, so when life presents an opportunity, they seize it without hesitation

Opportunity is defined as “a set of circumstances that makes it possible to do something.” I am sure you all are recognizing the big opportunities– invitation to a recruiting camp, showcase, etc. But let’s really break it down and focus on the little opportunities that you may be overlooking that have the greatest impact. The opportunity to hit the gym with your parents or friends, the opportunity to play in a box league, the opportunity to reach out to a local collegiate player to train with them, the opportunity to stay late after practice and help a teammate or yourself work on your dodges, or stick handling, or shooting.

It is these little opportunities that will raise your game immensely.  Gen. Colin Powell, former Secretary of State said “If you are going to achieve excellence in big things, you develop the habit in little matters. Excellence is not an exception, it is a prevailing attitude.” What he means by this is that if you are going to succeed on the grander scale you need to first succeed on a smaller scale. Start your day with making your bed. It is a little achievement but it is nonetheless an achievement and a start.

3. They create routines and hold themselves accountable

We all know routine is important, but we can all get a calendar and map out our week and think, wow, I am going to get so much done this week. But what I want you to do is get to the END of your week and say, “Wow, I GOT so much done this week!”

Look back and see how many actions you were able to cross off. This is accountability, and I promise you there is no one in your life that is going to force you to do anything. Your parents are great advocates of yours, along with your friends and teammates, but at the end of the day, the only person that can make you get up and run farther, or faster, or do a third set of squats IS YOU. This is a true testament to how bad do you want to be great?  I guarantee all those lacrosse players you are watching on TV seldom had to be told to run harder, run farther, or lift more.  They do it because they want to be great!

4. They fill their bodies with proper nutrients and a lot of it

Fuel.  Cars need it to run, engines machines need it to run, and we ABSOLUTELY need it to run. But you have to remember that it needs to be the right fuel. If you just went to the gym and worked out hard, then reward yourself with a healthy snack and some hydration. Don’t ruin everything you have achieved in the gym by getting drive through after. That is being counterproductive.

Remember that you are an elite athlete and may look a little different than your non-athlete friends. I am here to tell you that more is OK! You are strong and fit, and your body needs more because you are burning more. So don’t feel bad about finishing your whole sandwich, yogurt, apple and peanut butter, Cliff bar, banana, and huge water. You needed it! Because at the end of the day, if you thrive at the first three–getting up early, seizing the opportunity, and being accountable, then you will never reach your potential if your body cannot keep up. Eat healthy, eat often and hydrate all the time! Be that person in the class that always has a water bottle with them.

 5. They get the most out of every practice, drill, scrimmage, and game

You’ve gone to practice thinking about your upcoming math test, you’re tired from yesterday’s game, you don’t like Monday training sessions, you deserve a day off…

Highly successful athletes have bad days too, but they never give a bad effort or let themselves dog it through a drill or practice feeling sorry for themselves or making excuses.  We’ve already talked about seizing opportunities, but what if your opportunity comes on a less-than-ideal day for you?  Mental fortitude is another trait that is not inborn but learned and trained.  It’s an everyday attitude that is built through a consistent level of effort, regardless of the circumstances.

I went to West Point and played for legendary college coach Jack Emmer.  One of the many lessons I took from him was that you have to deal with what comes up and power through it if you want to win.  He would say, “If we lose, there’s no asterisk next to this game because….” Fill in the blank:

“We had an Army Physical Fitness Test this week” / “It snowed 18 inches on our field” / “The streets outside our facility are flooded” / “You have a 20-page paper due”

I could recite a long list of things I heard from Coach Emmer over my four years at Army, but the lesson it left us with is that you cannot let outside factors affect your mental and physical preparation to meet your opportunities to excel.  Try to use the energy from all the frustration or stress to fuel your focus during your training session or event…every thought you entertain that does not feed your success actually hampers it.

Remember, practice doesn’t make perfect…perfect practice makes perfect.

Whether you fall into the “natural talent” category or not, success at the highest levels of anything in life will require your time, effort, and focus.  Make yourself better at every opportunity, and enjoy the growth you’ll achieve, knowing that you’re ready for your opportunity when it presents itself.  It’s truly just up to you…do you want to think about the excuses you have or the success you want?

Comments No Comments »


Podcast

We’re here again with The Realities of College Recruiting Podcast Episode 2. This week’s episode is titled, “Times have changed.”

Our 2nd episode features Ryan Thompson (former college baseball player and MLB Scout) and Andrew Beinbrink (Former All-American & MLB Player) discussing just how much the recruiting process has changed in the last 10 years.

What’s the best route to take when considering college?
What are the best strategies to undertake?
Am I doing enough to get noticed by college coaches?

 

This podcast episode will also cover:
– Finding your own path to college
– Prioritizing which methods are the best to gain more exposure
– The amount of competition in today’s recruiting process
– Understanding where you fit on a college coaches recruiting board

Don’t want to miss an episode?

Sunbscribe on iTunes

About the Realities of College Recruiting Podcast:
The Realities of College Recruiting podcast, brought to you by SportsForce, will tackle some of the toughest college recruiting questions. Our college recruiting experts will share their personal expertise and key insights that will help you maximize your college recruiting efforts. This is a weekly podcast that is hosted by former MLB scout for the Cleveland Indians, 2x coach of the year (Junior College) and current recruiting advisor for SportsForce, Ryan Thompson The Realities of College Recruiting podcast will bring you interviews with some of the top college coaches from around the country in order to help make your college goals a reality! Raise your game with SportsForce!

Comments No Comments »


We would like to congratulate Marcus Yandall on his commitment to Elmhurst College! Here are Marcus’ recruiting story and interview after his commitment. Good luck as a Bluejay!

Marcus Yandall

1. Please share your recruiting story and status.

The process was very long but was very exciting at the same time. Towards the beginning of high school I was so set on playing at a division 1 school, until I realized all of the advantages of attending a smaller school at the division 3 level. On August 25, I verbally committed to Elmhurst College.

2. What school are you going to, and why did you choose them?

I committed to Elmhurst College because I felt like it was the best all-around fit for me. I fell in love with the city of Chicago, the opportunity to be a part of the honors program and be involved in the biology program to prepare me for medical school, and the environment that coach Morrell and his staff are creating at the school was very intriguing.

3. How did SportsForce help in the process?

SportsForce definitely played a huge role in my recruiting process. It opened up opportunities with the schools that ended up being in my top 10 and allowed me to get in touch with coaches in a simple way. Also, the player profile that SportsForce sets up on their website for you helps a lot and makes it easy for the coaches to see everything they need from you in one setting.

4. What advice would you give to other players and parents with the recruiting process?

I would definitely recommend starting early and not being afraid of reaching out to college coaches. With kids as young as 8th grade committing, getting a highlight video out to coaches as early as possible is definitely a good start. Also, getting in contact with coaches of schools that you think you want to pursue is key; if they don’t know you, you have no chance of playing at that school.

5. How excited are you for your future in college?

I am extremely excited to be attending Elmhurst College next year. Living in Chicago is going to be a lot of fun and getting a great education at a high-achieving school and playing lacrosse for a program that is headed in the right direction are just a few of the exciting factors.

6. How much money do you anticipate your family saving in college expenses because of you being recruited?

I anticipate my family saving a total of around $80,000 over the course of my 4 years in college.

7. Would you recommend SportsForce to any other student-athletes? Why?

I would recommend SportsForce to any athlete looking to play a college sport because of all of the help their service provides. SportsForce really makes sure you end up at the best-fitting school and provides you the tools and resources you need to easily make contact with the coaches of your choosing.

 

Over the last five years, SportsForce has helped over 1,000 student-athletes and families successfully navigate the college recruiting and athletic scholarship process while saving families on average $50,000 in college expenses.

Comments No Comments »


With this year’s summer club seasons complete and fall tryouts proceeding through late August and September, we thought this was the perfect time to take a look at NCAA DI recruiting schedules for college lacrosse and see where they fit in our fall recruiting plan. Additionally, we’ve provided the NCAA definitions of each recruiting period on the calendar.  You can find all the information below, straight from the NCAA, at the following links:

NCAA Division I Men’s Lacrosse Recruiting Calendar:

https://www.ncaa.org/sites/default/files/June2016_DIMensLacrosseCalendar_20160613.pdf

NCAA Recruiting Calendar FAQs:

http://www.ncaa.org/student-athletes/resources/recruiting-calendars?division=d1

 

Contact Periods

A contact period is a period of time when it is permissible for authorized athletics department staff members to make in-person, off-campus recruiting contacts and evaluations.

During a contact period a college coach may have face-to-face contact with college-bound student-athletes or their parents, watch student-athletes compete and visit their high schools, and write or telephone student-athletes or their parents.

Contact Defined:  A contact is any face-to-face encounter between a prospective student-athlete or the prospective student-athlete’s relatives, guardian(s) or individual of a comparable relationship and an institutional athletics department staff member or athletics representative during which any dialogue occurs in excess of an exchange of a greeting.  Any such face-to-face encounter that is prearranged (e.g., positions himself/herself in a location where contact is possible) or that takes place on the grounds of the prospective student-athlete’s educational institution or at the site of organized competition or practice involving the prospective student-athlete or the prospective student-athlete’s high school, preparatory school, two-year college or all-star team shall be considered a contact, regardless of the conversation that occurs. Any communication (e.g., face-to-face, telephone call or electronic transmission) with a prospective student-athlete at the site of organized competition involving the prospective student-athlete by athletics personnel who are attending the competition or who are aware of the competition also shall be considered a contact.

Evaluation Periods

An evaluation period is a period of time when it is permissible for authorized athletics department staff members to be involved in off-campus activities designed to assess the academic qualifications and playing ability of prospective student-athletes. No in-person, off-campus recruiting contacts shall be made with the prospective student-athlete during an evaluation period.

During an evaluation period a college coach may watch college-bound student-athletes compete, visit their high schools, and write or telephone student-athletes or their parents. However, a college coach may not have face-to-face contact with college-bound student-athletes or their parents off the college’s campus during an evaluation period.

Evaluation Defined: An evaluation is any off-campus activity designed to assess the academic qualifications or athletics ability of a prospective student-athlete, including any visit to a prospective student-athlete’s educational institution (during which no contact occurs) or the observation of a prospective student-athlete participating in any practice or competition at any site.

Quiet Periods

A quiet period is a period of time when it is permissible to make in-person recruiting contacts only on the institution’s campus. No in-person, off-campus recruiting contacts or evaluations may be made during the quiet period.

During a quiet period, a college coach may only have face-to-face contact with college-bound student-athletes or their parents on the college’s campus.  A coach may not watch student-athletes compete (unless a competition occurs on the college’s campus) or visit their high schools. Coaches may write or telephone college-bound student-athletes or their parents during this time.

Dead Periods

A dead period is a period of time when it is not permissible to make in-person recruiting contacts or evaluations on or off the institution’s campus or to permit official or unofficial visits by prospective student-athletes to the institution’s campus. It remains permissible, however, for an institutional staff member to write or telephone a prospective student-athlete during a dead period.

IMPORTANT TO NOTE

Institutional staff members may receive telephone calls placed by a prospective student-athlete at the prospective student-athlete’s own expense at any time, including before July 1 following the prospective student-athlete’s junior year in high school.

So please use this information to plan your fall/winter recruiting cycle.  Form your plan early, then just play hard, have fun, and good luck!

Comments No Comments »


Podcast

We’ve launched a brand new podcast to help parents and student-athletes understand the challenges, strategies, and tactics required in order to navigate the recruiting process with confidence.

Introducing The Realties of College Recruiting Podcast. Each week we will tackle some of the most important questions about the college recruiting process. Hosted by former collegiate athletes, The Realities of College Recruiting Podcast will give you expert advice and insights into the world of college recruiting.

In our first episode, Ryan Thompson (former college baseball player and MLB Scout) discusses when the best time to get started in the recruiting process is…

How early is too early?
When do colleges begin the recruiting process?
How do you get noticed in the first place?

Find out all of the answers to these questions and much more in this week’s episode!

This podcast episode will also cover:
– How athletic and academic ability factor into the recruiting process
– The differences between NCAA division levels
– Finding the best college fit for you
– Getting an unbiased evaluation is key

Don’t want to miss an episode?

Sunbscribe on iTunes

About the Realities of College Recruiting Podcast:
The Realities of College Recruiting podcast, brought to you by SportsForce, will tackle some of the toughest college recruiting questions. Our college recruiting experts will share their personal expertise and key insights that will help you maximize your college recruiting efforts. This is a weekly podcast that is hosted by former MLB scout for the Cleveland Indians, 2x coach of the year (Junior College) and current recruiting advisor for SportsForce, Ryan Thompson The Realities of College Recruiting podcast will bring you interviews with some of the top college coaches from around the country in order to help make your college goals a reality! Raise your game with SportsForce!

Comments No Comments »


Lacrosse off-season

In the last decade or so, a number of camps, showcases, tournaments and club teams have grown exponentially. Year-round lacrosse has become the norm, even in colder weather states. This includes play for both high school programs and club teams. With this trend of the ever-expanding season, there has been an increase in a number of players either getting injured or burning out at a young age. In this regard, the volume and accessibility of events, teams, and programs aimed at aiding with development and providing exposure to college coaches has been both a blessing and a curse.

With this newfound accessibility and today’s technology, more players are getting opportunities to be recruited by schools they would have previously never considered, even 10 years ago. Players can be recruited on a national level more easily, which gives student-athletes a better chance to find their best-fit college program. Players are getting more informed on the recruiting process and exposed to the different levels and divisions of college lacrosse. In general, it is easier to find a good athletic/academic/financial match than in previous years.

Our “regular season” is typically where we want to be at our best, as we have a daily practice and can play a brand of lacrosse more like the college game.  The challenge that we all face, as both players and coaches, revolves around the schedule. The LEAST convenient and LEAST realistic time for colleges to see you play is during your high school season. Coaches may occasionally be able to make it to a local game or to a game while on a road trip, but they are consumed with their own seasons, which puts a live evaluation on the back burner. So naturally, coaches are most actively recruiting and evaluating from late May-January. As it happens, the bulk of quality recruiting showcases and tournaments are scheduled during that period as well.

The most elite professional athletes in the world have a schedule that includes stretches of time devoted to rest (not complete inactivity, but a break from the repetitive motions required to compete).  It’s literally scheduled into their training plans by most professional sports teams’ training staffs.  So why do so many high school lacrosse players think it’s ok to have a longer season and less rest than professionals?  High school athletes are not done growing and developing. They have likely not prepared themselves physically to handle the strain they are putting on their bodies. They haven’t given their bodies any sufficient, extended period of time to heal, recover, and grow.

It’s a good idea that physical and mental rest be factored into every family’s plan for their growing student-athlete. Whether it be private lessons, camps, showcases, tournaments, club teams, training programs, or other specialty events, sometimes the correct answer is no. Families are dedicating increasing amounts of time and money every year hoping to find that golden ticket at the next event that gives their son a lacrosse scholarship. It is not uncommon to see high school players who never take a break from playing tournaments, high intensity camps, or other showcases for longer than a few weeks.

So what is the solution? These events/teams are not going away anytime soon, and likely they will only continue to increase in number and frequency. The burden of this responsibility really lies on players and their families to make smart, responsible decisions. Each player’s calendar will likely be unique to his situation.

Here are some tips to help set you up for success and health…

  1. Plan your calendar in advance for the entire year. Start with the active playing seasons (high school/club) and carefully select additional events and training as they fit in your schedule.
  2. Do not enter an event where you are expected to perform at max speed/intensity without preparing physically.  Getting ready to play requires at least a week or two of cardio, agility, and flexibility workouts.
  3. Plan a few periods of consecutive (2-3 minimum) weeks of rest throughout the year.
  4. Use your down time for strength/conditioning training, stick skills, and light lacrosse activity. Get back to fundamentals and lower intensity drills aimed to maintain and develop skills/mechanics.
  5. It’s ok to say no. It is flattering to be invited or chosen to play or participate in many events. Sometimes, however, it is not necessary. Plan in advance and try to avoid spur of the moment decisions on events you are not ready for physically, mentally, or financially.
  6. PLAY MULTIPLE SPORTS! It creates a natural off-season. Even if it is recreational or you will never play in college, it gives your mind and body a break. In most cases, the skills and coordination learned in other sports translates to you being a better athlete and lacrosse player.

Comments No Comments »


Search
Follow Us
Stay Connected
Get the SportsForce Blog in Your Email